A Publicly Verifiable Secret Sharing Scheme

We all know Shamir’s (t,n)-Secret Sharing Scheme: A dealer fixes a group \mathbf{Z}_p and selects a random polynomial P(x) of degree at most t-1 over this group. He sets the constant coefficient equal to your secret \sigma, then distributes n arbitrary evaluations of this polynomial as shares to the n parties. Any subset of t parties can pool their shares and reconstruct the polynomial via Lagrange interpolation.

What if we don’t want to trust the dealer nor the parties? Feldman’s Verifiable Secret Sharing Scheme allows the dealer to publish, in addition to the regular Shamir-shares, a generator g of the group \mathbf{Z}_p^* along with t proofs or commitments c_j for each coefficient of the polynomial P(x). Each party can verify that his share is correct by testing whether

\displaystyle g^{P(i)}\, \overset{?}{=} \, \prod_j{c_j^{i^j}} \bmod p.

However, the shares p(i) are still private. What if we want everyone to be able to verify the correctness of all shares without knowing what the shares are? This is achieved by a Publicly Verifiable Secret Sharing Scheme, such as the one developed by Berry Schoenmaker, assuming the discrete log problem is hard.

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Two MDS Array Codes for Disk Erasures: the Blaum-Bruck-Vardy Code and the BASIC Code

In this post, I am going to review two erasure codes: the Blaum-Bruck-Vardy code and the BASIC code (also here). These are erasure codes, which means, their purpose is to encode a number of data disks into a number of coding disks so that when one or more data/coding disks fail, the failed disk can be reconstructed using the existing data and coding disks.

A strength of these codes is that although the algebra is described on extension fields/rings over GF(2), the encoding/decoding process uses only Boolean addition/rotation operation and no finite field operation. These codes are also MDS (Maximum Distance Separable), which means they have the largest possible (minimum) distance for a fixed message-length and codeword-length.

(Recall that if a code has d data components and c parity components in its generator matrix in standard form, its distance is at most c + 1 by the Singleton bound. Hence the code is MDS if and only if it can tolerate c arbitrary disk failures.)

The BASIC code does the following things in relations to the BBV code:

  1. Adds a virtual parity bit after each disk, giving each disk an even parity
  2. Does polynomial arithmetic modulo 1+x^p instead of h(x) = 1+x+\cdots + x^{p-1} as in the case of BBV code
  3. Shows equivalence to the BBV code by making a nice observation via Chinese Remainder Theorem
  4. Proves MDS property for any number of coding disks when p is “large enough” and has a certain structure

Open Question: What is the least disk size for which these codes are MDS with arbitrary distance?

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