Two MDS Array Codes for Disk Erasures: the Blaum-Bruck-Vardy Code and the BASIC Code

In this post, I am going to review two erasure codes: the Blaum-Bruck-Vardy code and the BASIC code (also here). These are erasure codes, which means, their purpose is to encode a number of data disks into a number of coding disks so that when one or more data/coding disks fail, the failed disk can be reconstructed using the existing data and coding disks.

A strength of these codes is that although the algebra is described on extension fields/rings over GF(2), the encoding/decoding process uses only Boolean addition/rotation operation and no finite field operation. These codes are also MDS (Maximum Distance Separable), which means they have the largest possible (minimum) distance for a fixed message-length and codeword-length.

(Recall that if a code has d data components and c parity components in its generator matrix in standard form, its distance is at most c + 1 by the Singleton bound. Hence the code is MDS if and only if it can tolerate c arbitrary disk failures.)

The BASIC code does the following things in relations to the BBV code:

  1. Adds a virtual parity bit after each disk, giving each disk an even parity
  2. Does polynomial arithmetic modulo 1+x^p instead of h(x) = 1+x+\cdots + x^{p-1} as in the case of BBV code
  3. Shows equivalence to the BBV code by making a nice observation via Chinese Remainder Theorem
  4. Proves MDS property for any number of coding disks when p is “large enough” and has a certain structure

Open Question: What is the least disk size for which these codes are MDS with arbitrary distance?

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